Watchdog 'concern' over terror bill

Press Association, Wed 12 Oct 2005

The Government's anti-terror plans suffered a major blow after their own independent terror watchdog voiced fears about a key plank of the measures.

Lord Carlile of Berriew QC said he had "real concern" about the detention of nine suspected international terrorists pending deportation to Algeria or Jordan.

The nine, formerly known as the "Belmarsh detainees" and later placed on control orders, had effectively had their detention without charge reinstated, said Lord Carlile.

He also raised concerns about the Terrorism Bill as it was published in full by Home Secretary Charles Clarke.

Lord Carlile said plans to make it an offence to undergo or provide terrorist training may be "more extensive than required".
However, the leading barrister said he did not take issue with the controversial plan to increase the time police can hold suspects before charge from 14 days to three months. But this proposal did require a "much stronger form of judicial control", he added.
Lord Carlile, the Government's independent reviewer of counter-terrorism laws, said in a report it was "uncertain" when the Government might secure diplomatic agreements allowing the former Belmarsh detainees to be returned to their homelands.

"In my view it is of real concern that detention without charge should be reinstated in effect for this group of people unless there is an early and realistic prospect of the relevant memoranda of understanding being reached presently," he said.

Proposals to give police new powers to close mosques and other places of worship being used for terrorist activity also raised a number of difficulties, such as how to define a place of worship, he said.

"These are serious questions and require careful examination before we introduce what could be a law we might come to regret," he said of the proposed closure powers.

http://news.scotsman.com/latest.cfm?id=2078382005


Watchdog 'concern' over terror bill

Press Association, Wed 12 Oct 2005

Plans for new police powers to detain suspects for up to three months before charge may be vulnerable to a challenge under human rights laws, the Government's own anti-terror watchdog has said.
The warning came from Lord Carlile of Berriew QC as Home Secretary Charles Clarke published details of new measures to deport people with dual British citizenship if they are involved in terrorism.
The moves would allow someone to have their British passport taken away if the Home Secretary was satisfied it was necessary "for the public good".

Home Office minister Hazel Blears said the test for removing citizenship in such cases was currently too high.

In his report on the new Terrorism Bill and other anti-terror moves, Lord Carlile, the Government's independent reviewer of counter-terrorism laws, voiced "real concern" about the detention of nine suspected international terrorists pending deportation to Algeria or Jordan.

The nine, formerly known as the "Belmarsh detainees" who were later on control orders, had effectively had their detention without charge reinstated when they were detained for deportation in August, he said.

Of the three-month detention plans he said: "I question whether what is proposed in the Bill would be proof to challenge under the Human Rights Act given the length of extended detention envisaged."

Ms Blears insisted the legislation was compatible with human rights laws, adding : "It is right that people question and probe these issues, but the three-month period is what the police and security service say is necessary."

In further criticism, Lord Carlile said the proposed new offence of undergoing or providing terrorist training may be "more extensive than required", and plans to give police powers to close mosques needed "careful examination".

Foreign Secretary Jack Straw published a dossier which detailed how other countries deal with terror suspects, which had been expected to back up the Government's case for tough new powers.

http://news.scotsman.com/latest.cfm?id=2078622005


 
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Extraditions from the UK

Abschiebungen aus Großbritannien

 
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